FAQs About the Lymphatic System

FAQs About the Lymphatic System

The earlier lymphedema is treated, the more that can be done to prevent its progression

The lymphatic system is vital to the health of every individual. Scientific investigation of the lymphatic system will provide preventive and therapeutic benefits for a broad array of diseases. As an integral part of the immune system, it is both critical to the body's surveillance against cancer, and it can provide pathways for cancer to metastasize.

Unraveling the mysteries of the lymphatic system is vital to understanding many other disease processes. It plays a role in inflammatory and auto-immune disorders such as arthritis and systemic lupus, and is key to understanding the spread of AIDS and many infections. The Lymphatic Education & Research Network fosters and supports research to discover the links between lymphatic function, diseases, and levels of wellness.

What is the Lymphatic System

The lymphatic system is part of the immune system. It helps the body fight infections. It also helps maintain fluid balance in different parts of the body. It is made of a series of thin tubes, called lymphatic vessels. These vessels collect fluid, called lymph, from different parts of the body. Similar to blood vessels, these vessels then carry the lymph back to the bloodstream. Lymph is a colorless, watery fluid that is rich in white blood cells called lymphocytes. These cells play an important role in the immune system by protecting your body against infection. Lymphocytes form and are stored in lymph nodes, which are pea-sized collections of cells located throughout the body, such as in the armpit, groin, and neck area.